The Latest Breakthroughs in 3D Printing

3D printing has been around for a long time, with the first patent on a 3D printer that constructs projects in a 2D layer from the ground up, being in 1989. But we’ve came a long way since then, with 3D printers nearly being a common site in factories and businesses now. 3D printing has just gotten more and more efficient from its origin. 3D printing is assumed to get over one-hundred times faster in the next two decades, making manufacturing using 3D printers become mainstream and a common site for all manufacturers; for example, Massachusetts Institution of Technology (MIT), have developed a new 3D printer that is ten times faster than the models currently available for commercial purchase.

3D printers will become more environmentally friendly, with the advent of being able to 3D print plant-based protein, to make meats. Livestock produces at least a fifth of all greenhouse gases on earth, so this will be huge in terms of reducing the global carbon footprint, as well as in the future, being able to 3D print meat for space colonies. 3D printing is a lot like LEGO, making items out of little parts, visit stonefoot for the best LEGO reviews and products.

Medical advancements have been in 3D printing. Soon you’ll be able to 3D print drugs, soon it’ll be able to 3D print chemical reaction vessels, which is the process of creating a pharmaceutical drug. This is called “reactionware”. Bioprinting is a large ethical issue but it could benefit living mankind but faces the same controversy as stem cells. Bioprinting is the ability to print living cells. Bioprinting is sometime used in testing already, such as skin products to see how it would react to the cells. Also, fashion is starting to catch on, with designers using software to design clothes then print them out. This could become a staple in high street fashion soon.